Category Archives: Life in general

"Happy Holidays"

She breezed by my table at Starbucks. “Happy Holidays” she said as she handed me something. She moved quickly toward the door, and I started stammering. It was a Starbucks card.

Inside was a little card that said, “To: Beautiful Smile, From: Happy Holidays.”

“What’s your name?” I asked just before the door closed. “Lola,” she said, disappearing into the parking lot.

I had never seen her before. As she came into Starbucks I greeted her, and we talked a little about the weather. She was as sunny as the weather. What a blessing.

I hope our paths cross again. She’s the sort of person that makes this world bright.

Wild cat…


Thursday night I was working in my office, and I kept hearing cat sounds. That’s not so unusual; our neighborhood has several that prowl around.

But as I listened, it sounded like this was a kitten, not a full grown cat. So I grabbed my flashlight and went out to see what the commotion was.

What I found was a little tiny ball of fur huddled up against the foundation of our house. He snarled and hissed at me as if he was a 500 pound lion.

Bev and I kept him for the night. Our petting and cooing at him, turned off his combativeness. We tried to feed him too, but he was so tiny he wouldn’t take our offerings.

I even bought a dropper to feed him on Friday. Nothing worked. Finally the animal control officer came and took our little house guest to where he could be adopted.

I’m not a cat lover, but I must admit that I enjoyed the little guest’s brief appearance.

Blue is back….


About three weeks ago I took my car in for routine service. Merced Honda said it needed a new CV boot for the right front axle. No big deal, and that explained the little oil drops on my driveway. They said to schedule an appointment for the CV job.

The next week I took it in for that small repair. While there, they said that it would be prudent to replace the axle on that side. Again, no big deal. You might as well fix things like that when it is convenient rather than as an emergency repair.

I got my car back, and it drove a lot better. The steering was much tighter. Until….

On Sunday morning, September 10, I was driving, getting things ready for our 1st regular Sunday worship service. I was about to pull up to an intersection, and my car began making the most horrible grinding noise. I figured I had just lost my transmission. I had no forward motion. That created a big inconvenience for me on Sunday.

Monday I had it towed to Honda. “We’ll cover the cost if this is our fault, Mr. Logue.” Up until that point, I had assumed it was another thing going wrong on my car. But it wasn’t. It was the axle. Too short.

They repaired it, and I picked it up on Tuesday evening. I got about half a mile from Honda, and it started again. I called Honda, and they sent a tow truck at their expense to pick up my car. They also provided a free rental car. I couldn’t have asked for them to be any kinder.

I got my car back yesterday. It is nice to have it back, and even nicer that I didn’t have to pay for the added repairs.

Networking

Today our BNI meeting was cancelled due to a regional meeting in Turlock. Chapter members from Modesto to Merced were invited to hear presenters from the Los Angeles area talk about networking. It was well worth the 30 minute drive.

I was the first pastor to join BNI in this region. So from Sacramento to Fresno, I was the only pastor in any chapter. “What do you gain from your BNI membership?” is a common question.

I heard recently that another pastor had joined. I didn’t know where or what chapter. But today I found him. He showed up at the Turlock meeting I attended. His name is Brian, and he is planting a church as well. I was amazed at how many things we had in common in terms of cultural understandings, methodology, etc.

The more I attend these BNI meetings, the more convinced I am that this is the best way to do evangelism. Just showing up, being a friend, and listening. It’s amazing what happens then.

Diva in the House


We’ve got a Diva in the house now. Bev auditioned recently for Fiddler on the Roof, and got a role. She will be playing Yente, the Matchmaker.

She is enjoying the process of putting together live theater. The first couple of nights were used to work through the music, especially the group numbers. This weekend will be for blocking the moves of the actors.

The role she is playing is of that of the matchmaker in the tsarist Russia town of in Anatevka in 1905. The role of Yente is a charming role, and it brings humor to the story.

The play begins in mid September and runs for three weekends. The people cast for the roles are very talented people, and it will be a wonderfully presented play.

Diva in the House


We’ve got a Diva in the house now. Bev auditioned recently for Fiddler on the Roof, and got a role. She will be playing Yente, the Matchmaker.

She is enjoying the process of putting together live theater. The first couple of nights were used to work through the music, especially the group numbers. This weekend will be for blocking the moves of the actors.

The role she is playing is of that of the matchmaker in the tsarist Russia town of in Anatevka in 1905. The role of Yente is a charming role, and it brings humor to the story.

The play begins in mid September and runs for three weekends. The people cast for the roles are very talented people, and it will be a wonderfully presented play.

Simple Church

I just finished reading Simple Church by Thom Rainer and Eric Geiger. I’ve been reading it for a couple of weeks, and I am greatly impressed by its profound treatment of simplicity. Rainer and Geiger concluded as a result of a lot of research that simple churches grow more and are healthier than churches that are complex in structure and activity.

I also attended a one-day workshop on small groups in Sacramento. It was sponsored by Church Coaching Solutions and hosted by Stadia. Jim Putman was the presenter, and he is the senior pastor at a 7,000 member church in Idaho that has virtually all of its members involved in small groups. They have a phenomenally high rate of involvement.

What was interesting was that what Jim Putman presented closely mirrored what I had read in Simple Church. Simple, basic churches are actually healthier than churches that try to offer too many things and who are too complex in their organization.

I don’t know how supermarket churches will fare in coming years. They will be constantly having to offer something that is new and delicious in order to keep their momentum and structure. Simple churches, on the other hand, train small groups of people to think in terms of meaningful relationships and serving others.

Relationships and service are highly portable ideas and do not require large, complex structures to enact. At LifeSpring Church this simplicity will enable us to minister effectively to this community without over-burdening our members. Simplicity is so incredibly wise and easy to do, provided that you can turn loose of unnecessary traditions and baggage.

The Yosemite Bug

At 5:00 last night I suddenly had the fear that I had misremembered the time we were supposed to meet the others. I made some quick calls, but got no one.

So Bev and I left at 6:15 for a restaurant that we knew only as “The Hostel.” We were told it was a really good place to eat, and that it was located on the other side of Mariposa toward Yosemite.

We stopped at a gas station in Mariposa to get directions. “Where is ‘the hostel and how far away is it?'” The attendant told me it was about 5 miles up the road on the left.

If it had been up to me we would have turned around. We had driven a long way, passed a lot of places where a nice restaurant might have been, but no “Hostel.” But then, at the bottom of a long hill, was a sign for “Yosemite Bug Hostel and Cafe.” Up on the hill were a large number of cabins and lots of cars.

We parked the car and went into the cafe, hoping to see the friends we were meeting. No friends! By now it was 7:30, and I understood why the meeting time was set this late.

For a moment I was entertaining the idea that there must be another “The Hostel” somewhere around. I even asked a guy if he knew about another one. Bev and I sat for a while, and then our friends began to arrive. Eureka!

We had a perfectly delightful evening with three other couples as well as a very good meal in a place you’d never expect on the road to Yosemite.

The Yosemite Bug

At 5:00 last night I suddenly had the fear that I had misremembered the time we were supposed to meet the others. I made some quick calls, but got no one.

So Bev and I left at 6:15 for a restaurant that we knew only as “The Hostel.” We were told it was a really good place to eat, and that it was located on the other side of Mariposa toward Yosemite.

We stopped at a gas station in Mariposa to get directions. “Where is ‘the hostel and how far away is it?'” The attendant told me it was about 5 miles up the road on the left.

If it had been up to me we would have turned around. We had driven a long way, passed a lot of places where a nice restaurant might have been, but no “Hostel.” But then, at the bottom of a long hill, was a sign for “Yosemite Bug Hostel and Cafe.” Up on the hill were a large number of cabins and lots of cars.

We parked the car and went into the cafe, hoping to see the friends we were meeting. No friends! By now it was 7:30, and I understood why the meeting time was set this late.

For a moment I was entertaining the idea that there must be another “The Hostel” somewhere around. I even asked a guy if he knew about another one. Bev and I sat for a while, and then our friends began to arrive. Eureka!

We had a perfectly delightful evening with three other couples as well as a very good meal in a place you’d never expect on the road to Yosemite.