It is what it is.

AttorneyOur free society provides for equal access to trial by jury for every citizen of our country.  It’s one of the ways we preserve individual freedoms and insure that a dictatorial, arbitrary form of government does not take over.

Courts are anal about assembling juries that are as fair as possible.  Potential jurors are asked various iterations of “Do you think you can render an objective verdict?”  The ones that say “no” or that the court perceives to have too many external, prejudicial influences are excused. Continue reading It is what it is.

We want to sit at the head table.

Power 03“You let people walk all over you.”  A friend recounted how an advice-giver told him to “get a spine.”  Seemed like good advice.  Being everyone’s doormat is not a good thing.

Although…  Power is funny because it doesn’t always give what it promises to its possessor.   Continue reading We want to sit at the head table.

Twelve Plus Two

Courtroom 01A dreaded jury summons came with the bills and adverts for the Land’s End sale.  Pangs of guilt also came because jury service should be an honor rather than a nuisance – a privilege of living in a democratic society.

The badge number is sixteen-0-two.  From now on four digits are our names to preserve anonymity.  Names get changed a second time after the panel is seated.  Only one or two digits now – one through fourteen. Continue reading Twelve Plus Two

Red Sky in the Morning

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAShakespeare said it.  “Like a red morn that ever yet betokened, Wreck to the seaman, tempest to the field, Sorrow to the shepherds, woe unto the birds, Gusts and foul flaws to herdmen and to herds.”  (From Venus and Adonis.)

So did Jesus.  “When it is evening you say, ‘It will be fair weather, for the sky is red.’ And in the morning, ‘It will be stormy today, for the sky is red and threatening.’  (Matthew 16:2,3) Continue reading Red Sky in the Morning

The Apprentice

Old School HouseBefore a teacher left his village on a long trip he entrusted his two best apprentices with the responsibility of insuring that progress in education continued in the small community.  The village had rudimentary needs, and there was much work to be done in the teacher’s absence.

The first apprentice was meticulous in his lesson preparations and in doing things exactly as the teacher did them.  Rules were strictly enforced.  Lesson books were carefully followed.  Lunch was always served at exactly the same hour.  The apprentice left for the day precisely 10 minutes after the students left.  He was keenly aware of the exact obligations of the job. Continue reading The Apprentice